Traveling

How My Husband’s Parkinson’s Disease Has Changed My Travels – TravelAwaits

Summary

When we landed in Dallas-Fort Worth, I had a message from American Airlines that it had changed our seat assignments. For our leg to San Antonio, we’d be sitting in the inside two seats of a back row. We had just come to terms, on that first leg from Fort Myers, Florida, with the fact that my husband could no longer occupy his favored window seat. It was near impossible for him to get up out of it.

At the gate, I spoke with an agent and explained my husband’s situation — the firs…….

npressfetimg-605.png

When we landed in Dallas-Fort Worth, I had a message from American Airlines that it had changed our seat assignments. For our leg to San Antonio, we’d be sitting in the inside two seats of a back row. We had just come to terms, on that first leg from Fort Myers, Florida, with the fact that my husband could no longer occupy his favored window seat. It was near impossible for him to get up out of it.

At the gate, I spoke with an agent and explained my husband’s situation — the first time I’d publicly voiced it, and I felt a little like I was taking advantage of his health issue. The agent, however, was more than compliant. She not only got us back to our original seats but had us board the airplane first, ahead of all the other passengers. It is one of many lessons I’m learning on this new journey I’m taking in life: Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Note: Some of the travels described herein were sponsored in part.

Parkinson’s Plus COVID: Crashing Into Change

We had heard Rob’s diagnosis two weeks after I returned from Japan in December 2019: Parkinson’s Disease. Right before Christmas. A couple of months before coronavirus impacted our lives. He was 68.

In early January, I took a short, planned work trip to the Bahamas, one of my regular beats as a freelance travel and food writer. I didn’t suspect it would be my last flight for more than a year.

We looked forward to a birthday weekend in St. Augustine, Florida, in March and a trip to Ireland in April. Of course, neither happened.

Yes, my husband’s PD has changed the way I travel, but COVID-19 also affected things in ways bad and not so bad. Because Rob was anxious to travel while he still could, we hit the road soon after lockdown and as often as possible. Then he was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Then skin cancer. (“You’re not going to get much on trade-in for that model,” my friend quipped in a text.)

Rob and I have always traveled. We’ve covered ground from a Maine Windjammer sail and a week in Quebec to excursions to New Zealand (where he scuba-dived, I wimped out because of the cold), Iceland (where we did two ATV adventures), and Croatia (where we island-hopped with two friends). Now grounded by a pandemic, we yearned for the escape travel afforded us from the respective businesses we run. 

Before: Island-hopping with friends in Croatia (Photo Credit: Chelle Koster Walton)

Road-tripping at last, we traveled to North Carolina’s Blue Ridge and the Great Smokies in September 2020. The necessity to change my travel patterns already began surfacing. His fear of heights reached crippling altitudes and the slowing of his pace made me pause. It became …….

Source: https://www.travelawaits.com/2707544/how-husbands-parkinsons-disease-has-changed-travel/